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Low Latency Blogs

Pete Harris

When one hears the term 'Big Data' one is drawn to thinking about batch analysis of vast datasets, such as web logs, click streams and, apparently, phone records. Technologies like Hadoop and NoSQL are mentioned, already in the context of their lack of performance, and murky ROI. But in the financial markets, the world of big data is different: it's real-time, it's high velocity, and it packs enormous value. Which is why we're continuing to focus on how low-latency technologies are converging with the big data world to move beyond simple - and increasingly obsolete - 'fastest execution' trading models.

Pete Harris

"Everyone wants low latency ... the trouble is no one wants to pay for it," were words spoken recently by a senior executive of a major financial IT vendor. It was a private meeting, so I won't name the individual or the company, but what was said resonated with me, because it echoed my increasing views. For me, investment in low-latency technology has become similar to investing in disaster recovery - essential and important, but not a core business focus, or really very exciting.

Pete Harris

Researchers from a number of U.S. universities, tapping into supercomputing power and optimising code, believe they have made a "game changing" step in the speedy analysis of financial markets, reducing operations from hours or even days, down to minutes.

Managed connectivity and co-lo specialist MarketPrizm plans to introduce a hosted tick database of global exchange data in Q4 of this year, representing the latest vendor to offer tick data as a service to trading and investment firms looking to leverage it for algorithmic backtesting and quantitative analysis.

Sarah Underwood

TMX Atrium is upgrading its North American network, has completed an upgrade of its European network and has experienced a flurry of activity around third-party connectivity over the past couple of months, but there is more to come as the provider of managed low-latency connectivity meets the needs of customers seeking lowest latencies as well as those looking for a high-performance trading environment.

Pete Harris

Memory technology specialist Diablo Technologies has introduced its TeraDIMM architecture, allowing Flash memory to be supported directly by the DRAM memory bus on servers, reducing latency and jitter for solid state disks. This approach from the Ottawa, Canada company is likely to be attractive for developers of trading applications, which leverage SSDs for such tasks as maintaining transaction state and audit trail data, and trade and quote time series, in a persistent manner.

Sarah Underwood

Latency management specialist TS-Associates is planning to integrate Correlix, the trade flow analysis tool it acquired in July 2012, and TipOff, the network and data flow monitoring tool it developed in-house since 2006.

Sarah Underwood

Quincy Data, a provider of low latency market data, and its partner McKay Brothers, a developer of microwave networks spanning key financial centres, have come a long way in the short time since they were set up in 2010, but they have further to go with plans to build out additional connectivity and enhance their market data services.

Sarah Underwood

Volta Data Centres powered up its first data centre in central London in April 2013 and has since secured its first customer and an additional carrier to those already embedded in the building. And there is more to come as the company builds out the 45,000 square feet of hosting space at the Great Sutton Street site it acquired back in May 2011 - offering financial services firms a resilient power supply, low-latency connectivity and, if Volta can attract their attention, access to collocated exchanges.